‘A Small Needful Fact’: Possibly the Most Heartbreaking Piece on Eric Garner You’ll Read´PLUS: Every other week, Truthdig will publish poems that offer insight into current events and sociopolitical themes relevant to today’s world!!!


‘A Small Needful Fact’: Possibly the Most Heartbreaking Piece on Eric Garner You’ll Read

Posted on Jul 1, 2015

    A 2015 memorial for Eric Garner in New York City’s Grand Central Station. (Tina Leggio CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Ross Gay’s unforgettable poem about Eric Garner—who was choked to death by an NYPD officer last July—reads like a memorial wreath, delicately pieced together with pain and sprouts of hope.

A Small Needful Fact

Is that Eric Garner worked
for some time for the Parks and Rec.
Horticultural Department, which means,
perhaps, that with his very large hands,
perhaps, in all likelihood,
he put gently into the earth
some plants which, most likely,
some of them, in all likelihood,
continue to grow, continue
to do what such plants do, like house
and feed small and necessary creatures,
like being pleasant to touch and smell,
like converting sunlight
into food, like making it easier
for us to breathe.

Ross Gay is a gardener and teacher living in Bloomington, Ind. His book, “Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude,” is available from University of Pittsburgh Press.

*** THETRUTHDIG.com
Used with permission. This piece does not form part of our Truthdig original poetry series, as it’s already been published on another site. For more information on how to submit a poem to Truthdig, click here.

***
Please feel free to share Split This Rock Poem of the Week widely. We just ask you to include all of the information in this post, including this request. Thanks! If you are interested in reading past poems of the week, feel free to visit the blog Archive.

Every other week, Truthdig will publish poems that offer insight into current events and sociopolitical themes relevant to today’s world. From entries across the nation, Truthdig staff will select poems based on both their artistic qualities as well as the social issues they discuss. To read our guidelines and submit a poem for our consideration, click here.

More Below the Ad

Advertisements

4 Comments

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s